Eddie Beyuka

Eddie Beyuka lived in Zuni Pueblo and is best known for his bolos and standing figures of Kachinas and dancers executed in channel inlay with a variety of materials-generally turquoise, mother of pearl, jet, coral, and others-skillfully integrated in his famous creations. He also provides stands for the bolas so that they may be displayed as sculptures when not being worn.

The three-dimensional components of his pieces, such as full-round miniature drums and baskets make them very distinctive. Beyuka started making jewelry in 1956, working with his wife Madeline for a number of years. Madeline did the inlay and Eddie did the silverwork on their collaborative pieces. After they divorced, Eddie started doing both the silver and stonework on his jewelry. Sons Jonathan and Filbert do work that is very similar in style and subject matter to their father's. Daughter Christine is also a jeweler, but she does not produce Kachina figures.

Beyuka was featured in the "Jewels of the Southwest" exhibit at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Santa Fe, in 2002. His work is in the collection of the Peabody Museum, Harvard University, and in the collections of a number of private individuals.He was captured by the Japanese in World War II and survived the Bataan Death March. After the war, he went back to school. In 1956, he began making jewelry, specializing in mosaic and channel inlay.

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